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SharePoll: What do you think of the ASA guidelines for advertising broadband speed?

In our last opinion article, we discussed the new ASA (Advertising Standards Authority) and CAP (Committee of Advertising Practice) guidelines for the advertising of broadband speeds and ‘unlimited’ broadband packages and looked at how this change would affect resellers, end users and the industry as a whole. The new guidelines are set to take effect from April 1st 2012. We would like to know what your views are on these new guidelines  and have therefore added a new poll to gather your thoughts. Please also feel free to leave us a comment below.

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2 Responses to “Poll: What do you think of the ASA guidelines for advertising broadband speed?”

  1. If the figures could be based on throughput and not connection speed then they may make a bit more sense as that would show the ISPs that have heavily congested networks, but connection speed has nothing to do with the ISP.

  2. Absolutely Karl. What a load of rubbish the new guidelines are. I misread the draft protocols first off from Ofcom and thought they were talking about real speeds. It’s ludicrous that we should confuse consumers even more with figures that effectively mean nothing. ISP’s should give accurate real-world indications of the speeds the end user will actually achieve not the sync speed they’ll get from any ISP. End users are complaining about signing up to over-congested ISP’s, realising their speeds are awful at peak times and not being able to do anything about it because they are in a 1 year contract. Published sync speeds does nothing to address this.

    End users that don’t understand that “up to 24Mbps” means exactly what it says and describes the underlying technology/protocol used, are not going to understand the new methods at all – it’s going to create more confusion not less. I appreciate that there are many people that don’t really know what 24Mbps is, let alone the “up to” part – which is fine.

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