UPDATE: Can Internet.org coexist with net neutrality (and encryption)?

Posted on May 27 2015 by Neil Watson | Comments Off on UPDATE: Can Internet.org coexist with net neutrality (and encryption)?
Categories : Net Neutrality, Security

We recently discussed the criticism Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg was facing with his new Internet.org initiative which aims to enable the world’s poorest people to access the Internet for free by charging the content providers for the end users’ access. Whilst seemingly a noble idea, it is receiving increasing disapproval for its obvious contradiction with net neutrality and now further concerns have been raised about security and privacy.

As we said in our last article, in principle, the idea of providing free Internet access to some of the world’s poorest people is admirable but, as Mr Zuckerberg has admitted himself, delivering free access to the whole Internet simply isn’t possible:

“It costs tens of billions of dollars every year to run the Internet, and no operator could afford this if everything were free, But it is sustainable to build free basic services that are simpler, use less data and work on all low-end phones.”

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Can Internet.org coexist with net neutrality?

Posted on Apr 29 2015 by Neil Watson | Comments Off on Can Internet.org coexist with net neutrality?
Categories : Net Neutrality

Facebook founder, Mark Zuckerberg has come under scrutiny for his latest Internet.org initiative after concerned partners in India have argued it could pose a threat to net neutrality.

The Internet.org project aims to provide end users within some of the world’s poorest countries (initially at least) with free access to some Internet content which is paid for by the content provider rather than the end user. Surely, providing the poorest people with free access to the Internet is a good thing, right?

In principle, yes it is. However, to do that the cost of delivering that content to the end user is paid for by the content provider rather than the end user. Therefore, this project is only granting free access to limited content and this is where the problem lies. The concern is that this goes against the fundamental principles of net neutrality, which requires all content on the Internet to be treated equally and therefore accessed equally. The Internet.org project will only provide free access to content from partners that are involved in the project and are therefore paying for access to their own service – which is the fundamental opposite of net neutrality!

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2014 – The Best Bits of Opinion

Posted on Dec 17 2014 by Darren Farnden | Comments Off on 2014 – The Best Bits of Opinion
Darren Farnden, Head of Marketing

Darren Farnden, Head of Marketing

As avid readers of our Opinion blog we’re sure you’re already aware of the major issues that have plagued the industry over the last 12 months, but just in case you missed any our latest eBook gives you a quick recap of the best, and most important, bits.

It covers the ongoing data retention debacle, the increasing pressure on ISPs regarding security, the legal protection for net neutrality, the unexpected ‘right to be forgotten’ ruling, the never ending fight against piracy and the expected role of ISPs, ISPAs plans to improve the ADR system and a look at the key trends of 2014!

You can download it for free

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Meet the author – Neil Watson

Posted on Dec 02 2014 by Neil Watson | Comments Off on Meet the author – Neil Watson

It’s time for another ‘meet the author’ article and this time we are introducing our Head of Service Operations, Neil Watson…

How long have you worked at Entanet?

I’ve not long surpassed my 8 year anniversary – and boy has it gone quickly!

What are your key responsibilities within the business and what are your areas of expertise?

I’m responsible for running the technical support, customer services, premier support and solutions provision teams.

With regards to opinion, which topics do you usually cover and why?

I tend to cover a range of subjects from net neutrality, data retention to BDUK and anything operational. Net neutrality is a key principle of the Internet and any attempt to create a multi-tiered access, especially for commercial gains, should be resisted. I’ve also covered content controls and, whilst anyone that could be considered vulnerable should be protected, I don’t believe that forcing ISPs to become the front line of such controls is a sensible approach – I’d much prefer to tackle the causes rather than implement something that will be simple to circumnavigate.

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The A-Z of industry issues (part 2)

Posted on Jul 02 2014 by Darren Farnden | Comments Off on The A-Z of industry issues (part 2)

Here it is, what you’ve all been waiting for……the second part of our A-Z, or should that be K-Z of industry issues!

Darren Farnden, Head of Marketing

Darren Farnden, Head of Marketing

K – Kids and protecting them online

How do we effectively protect our children online? Where does parental responsibility end and parental controls begin? It’s a fine balancing act and an important one. Whilst we commend the largest consumer focused ISPs for providing free parental controls to help guard against unsuitable material for minors, it’s not the end of the story. This needs to be backed up with education and parental responsibility. This site contains some useful advice: http://www.saferinternet.org/safer-internet-day.

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New teeth to protect net neutrality?

Posted on Apr 29 2014 by Neil Watson | Comments Off on New teeth to protect net neutrality?
Categories : Net Neutrality, Regulation

Earlier this month the European Parliament (EP) voted to legally protect net neutrality, ensuring that all traffic across the Internet will be treated equally by ISPs without any form of discrimination.

Neil Watson, Head of Service Operations

Neil Watson, Head of Service Operations

MEPs have become increasingly concerned that without such protection, network providers could favour certain types of traffic  and charge the content provider (e.g. BBC for iPlayer)a premium for this whilst throttling traffic from rival content providers – leading to potentially anti-competitive behaviour. Such activities have already been reported among some mobile operators who have allegedly blocked and throttled Skype across their networks. This is obviously bad news for consumers and could restrict future innovation and make market entry more difficult.

Therefore the EP’s news has been welcomed by many net neutrality advocates including La Quadrature du Net, the non-profit association that defends the rights and freedom of citizens on the Internet, who said: “Today’s victory on Net neutrality is the most important one for the protection of freedom online in Europe since the rejection of ACTA in July 2012. The EU Parliament made clear that the Internet commons should be free of corporate capture, and remain a space where freedom of communication and innovation can thrive.”

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Poll: Is the European Parliament right to protect net neutrality by law or should ISPs be able to prioritise traffic and charge content providers?

Posted on Apr 28 2014 by Gemma Dickinson | 1 Comment

The European Parliament (EP) recently voted to protect net neutrality with new laws, ensuring that ISPs are unable to prioritise certain types of traffic or charge content providers a premium for delivering their services. The subject of net neutrality has always been controversial but this was particularly surprising as it is the complete opposite of the approach taken by the US. We will be covering this news in more detail in a new article shortly, keep an eye out for that.

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Mobile operators must follow net neutrality principles, says ITSPA

Posted on Mar 08 2012 by Guest | Comments Off on Mobile operators must follow net neutrality principles, says ITSPA

The issue of net neutrality has been regularly debated over the years and is something we’ve covered many times on this blog, but a recent report by ITSPA (the Internet Telephony Service Providers’ Association) identifies clear breaches of net neutrality by mobile operators with regards to VoIP traffic and raises new concerns for the industry. ITSPA have kindly agreed to share their concerns on this issue with us…

Guest article from ITSPA

Guest article from ITSPA

“VoIP (Voice over IP) is the future of voice services. As readers will know, VoIP provides new added-value applications and cost benefits to both businesses and home users. It will only continue to grow as the UK’s next generation network rollout continues. The technology has developed significantly in recent years, to the point where in many instances the customer experience exceeds that of traditional circuit-switched telephony.

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Poll: Which of the following issues will most greatly affect the Internet market in 2012?

Posted on Dec 05 2011 by Gemma Dickinson | 1 Comment

It’s been a busy year for the Internet industry with lots of controversial issues and news affecting ISPs, consumers and other industry bodies. We have covered many of these items on this opinion website. However, we would like to know your thoughts. Which of the issues raised in 2011 do you think will most greatly affect the Internet market in 2012? You can let us know your opinions on this by participating in our poll or by leaving us a comment below.

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The net neutrality black list

Posted on Oct 20 2011 by Neil Watson | Comments Off on The net neutrality black list

In the UK and across most of Europe we have no legislation to protect net neutrality, the principle of treating all traffic equally on the Internet. The reason for the lack of legislation is because most parties within the industry believe it is unnecessary and can be managed through self regulation and voluntary codes. However, two civil groups, La Quadrature du Net (France) and Bits for Freedom (Netherlands) disagree and have introduced a new website via which citizens can report any net neutrality violations.

Neil Watson, Head of Service Operations

Neil Watson, Head of Service Operations

The main concern with regards to net neutrality revolves around ISPs using their traffic management strategies to give priority to certain content providers who pay a premium, or alternatively blocking or restricting the performance of content from rival organisations or content providers that have not paid the ISP. For example, a mobile provider could restrict content from Skype or if an ISP had an agreement with the BBC they could prioritise their traffic over rival content providers. Such agreements could stifle creativity and lead to a tiered Internet.

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