Openrexit means Openrexit?

Posted on Nov 30 2016 by Darren Farnden | No Comments
Categories : BT, Ofcom, Regulation

Yesterday’s trade press was dominated by the news that Ofcom has issued a directive that BT must ‘legally separate’ from its Openreach division. On the face of it, the move is designed to level the market playing field and encourage fairer competition but of course, whether it does remains to be seen. It’s important to appreciate that BT won’t have to split Openreach off entirely – it will still own Openreach, albeit as a legally separate entity. So what will this mean for the industry, resellers and customers?

Openreach will become a distinct company with its own board, says Ofcom, with non-executives and a chairperson not affiliated with BT (the newly appointed former Ofcom board member Mike McTighe). Ofcom also wants Openreach to have control over its branding and budget allocation. Importantly, it will have a duty to treat all of its customers equally.

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Goodbye Investigatory Powers Bill, Hello Investigatory Powers ACT

Posted on Nov 17 2016 by Paul Heritage-Redpath | No Comments

This has been a year of unthinkable events, so it should come as no surprise that last night the Investigatory Powers Bill (IPB) passed the final hurdle in gaining approval by both the House of Commons and the House of Lords. All that’s left for it to become law is to gain Royal Assent – i.e. the Queen has to sign it off.

Entanet has campaigned hard against the IPB and its previous incarnations. Given the volume of data breaches already this year, as a responsible ISP we consider the collection of every citizen’s browsing history to be a profoundly bad idea; it is inevitable that, at best, there will be scope creep among government departments. At worst, your life will fall into the wrong hands.

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What you haven’t been told about BEREC’s net neutrality guidelines

Posted on Sep 06 2016 by Neil Watson | No Comments
Categories : Net Neutrality, Regulation

This time last week we were readying ourselves for BEREC (that’s the Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communications to you and us) to publish its latest round of guidance on net neutrality. The guidelines that it’s produced aim to help Ofcom (and its European counterparts) enforce the “common rules to safeguard equal and non-discriminatory treatment of traffic in the provision of internet access services and related end-users’ rights” that came into force in November 2015. Following BEREC’s press conference, it didn’t take long for net neutrality advocates to declare the guidelines a victory for civil society. Meanwhile, telecoms companies across Europe and America, who have been campaigning to be able to exploit the Internet’s commercial opportunities to their fullest extent (this doesn’t include Entanet we hasten to add), gave their views on “a missed opportunity” through gritted teeth.

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Where there’s blame there’s a claim – really?

Posted on Aug 04 2016 by Neil Watson | 1 Comment
Categories : ADR, Broadband, Ofcom, Regulation

Over the last fortnight there have been a litany of connectivity faults preventing users getting online. First up was a power outage at TeleCity on the 20th July, followed by a failure at Telehouse North the very next day. Zen then suffered an outage that affected its DSL and leased line Internet services, and this week Sky’s fibre network was hit with an unusual routing problem and Virgin Media suffered a major fibre break. No business – no matter how big or small – is immune from faults that affect service delivery.

The outages that affected central infrastructure (TeleCity, Telehouse North and Virgin’s fibre break) impacted everyone in the supply chain. Some of our partners’ customers were unable to get online, along with the retail customers of BT, Plusnet and others, for several hours. There wasn’t anything we could do to physically fix the issues as the repair work was under their control; we could only keep our customers informed and manage their dissatisfaction as best we could. But the experience got us thinking: if Ofcom’s proposals for automatic compensation had been in place, how much happier would affected customers have been, and whose pocket would be feeling the pinch?

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So, who is Matt Hancock?

Posted on Jul 21 2016 by Neil Watson | No Comments
Categories : Government, Ofcom, Regulation

We certainly can’t take all the credit, but Ed Vaizey was unceremoniously dumped from his role as Minister of State for Culture and the Digital Economy last Friday evening. His replacement is the MP for West Suffolk, Matt Hancock.

Representing West Suffolk since 2010, and serving as George Osborne’s chief of staff before that, Mr Hancock isn’t a complete neophyte when it comes to politics. But what of that subject so close to our hearts? Is he likely to be any better at promoting connectivity issues and engaging with the industry than his predecessor?

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