IPv6 explained

Posted on Aug 11 2014 by Paul Heritage-Redpath | Comments Off on IPv6 explained
Categories : IPv6, Reselling

OK, OK so you already know that IPv4 addresses have pretty much ran out now and that as ISPs we all need to ensure that we can support IPv6 addresses – we’ve been harping on about that for years and covered it several times on this blog!

Paul

Paul Heritage-Redpath, Product Manager

But do you really know what IPv6 is and how it works? Do you know what benefits IPv6 brings to your customer? Do you know what went wrong with IPv4? and more importantly…what happened to IPv5?

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Improving ADR with ISPA

Posted on Aug 05 2014 by Guest | Comments Off on Improving ADR with ISPA
Categories : ADR, Government, Ofcom, Reselling

Along with many of our peers we have been dissatisfied with the current Alternate Dispute Resolution (ADR) scheme for a while now. Whilst we appreciate the importance of an ADR scheme, we believe the current process is unfairly biased against the ISP who has to foot the bill regardless of the outcome, provides little to no feedback on rulings and is too easily abused by consumers. That’s why we were delighted to hear ISPA are working alongside Government and OFCOM to improve the current system, and we were even more delighted when ISPA offered to discuss their improvement plans with us in a guest blog. Andrew Kernahan, Public Affairs Manager at ISPA explains…

Paul

Andrew Kernahan, Public Affairs Manager, ISPA

The Communications Act made belonging to an Alternate Dispute Resolution (ADR) scheme a legal requirement for all telecommunications providers for consumer customers and businesses of less than 10 employees. There are two Ofcom-approved providers, CISAS and Ombudsman Services, with ISPA members entitled to free CISAS membership as part of ISPA membership. ISPA also takes complaints from members’ customers as a way of managing a customer complaint before going to ADR, and we think this has saved members a lot of time and money over the years.

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The A-Z of industry issues (part 2)

Posted on Jul 02 2014 by Darren Farnden | Comments Off on The A-Z of industry issues (part 2)

Here it is, what you’ve all been waiting for……the second part of our A-Z, or should that be K-Z of industry issues!

Darren Farnden, Head of Marketing

Darren Farnden, Head of Marketing

K – Kids and protecting them online

How do we effectively protect our children online? Where does parental responsibility end and parental controls begin? It’s a fine balancing act and an important one. Whilst we commend the largest consumer focused ISPs for providing free parental controls to help guard against unsuitable material for minors, it’s not the end of the story. This needs to be backed up with education and parental responsibility. This site contains some useful advice: http://www.saferinternet.org/safer-internet-day.

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The A-Z of industry issues (Part 1)

Posted on Jun 25 2014 by Darren Farnden | Comments Off on The A-Z of industry issues (Part 1)

We cover a great deal of topical industry matters on this blog so as a quick overview and update, here is an (almost) complete A-Z to highlight some of the most controversial ones that we discuss regularly and that you might be interested in or at least should be aware of…

Darren Farnden, Head of Marketing

Darren Farnden, Head of Marketing

A – ADR (Alternative Dispute Resolution)

Back in 2012 OFCOM announced its plans to change the current ADR system for ISPs to make it more consistent. With the current system, very similar complaints can be dealt with very differently leading to dissatisfaction for the ISPs and the complainants. Little news has followed this announcement as OFCOM continued to gather feedback on the proposals but in March 2014 ISPA echoed our original perspective and called for changes to the cost allocation of the disputes as ISPs are usually left to pay for the ADR charges even when they win their cases. This is one to keep an eye on and we will provide updates as further news is announced.

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How important is a network anyway?

Posted on Sep 05 2013 by Steve Lalonde | Comments Off on How important is a network anyway?

A customer once said to me (in quite colourful terms actually) that he couldn’t care less who owns the network, what technology it uses, where it is or how much it had cost to build-out, as long as it works. To most customers – and thus by default most resellers – that is fundamentally all that matters.

Steve Lalonde, Chief Technical Officer

Steve Lalonde, Chief Technical Officer

I’ve heard similar views expressed plenty of times and it’s easy to sympathise with this standpoint. From the end customer’s perspective, all that matters is that the service ‘does what it says on the tin’, as it were; that it delivers what it’s supposed to deliver. But to the partner, the network can make a distinct and vitally important difference.

The first and perhaps the biggest differentiator the network can give resellers is flexibility. Most service providers offer their partners a range of services, but they’re almost always quite tightly defined in terms of the bandwidth, usage allowances, thresholds, SLAs and other features. This is because the actual network belongs to someone else. If you wanted to tailor connectivity to suit a particular set of requirements, it might be possible, but there would almost certainly be limitations and restrictions on what you could do.

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Selling with care – A guide to consultative selling

Posted on Jul 22 2013 by Stephen Barclay | Comments Off on Selling with care – A guide to consultative selling

With businesses relying on their digital links to the outside world to stay operational, responsive and competitive, and more choice of connectivity services than ever, resellers need to focus on the needs of individual customers.

Stephen Barclay, Head of Sales

Stephen Barclay, Head of Sales

Any good sales person will tell you selling is mostly about listening and applying common sense to help the customer solve their problem. Unfortunately it’s not quite that simple. Every customer has a different story to tell and their own particular challenges. Every customer wants to be treated as a special case.

These truisms are becoming more pronounced in today’s market. Customers are faced with what must seem a bewildering array of connectivity options. They’re bombarded with messages about superfast broadband, EFM, GEA and many other kinds of service. All most of them want though is a reliable connection with the bandwidth, availability and performance they need to run their business efficiently.

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The connectivity scale part two: Where does broadband end and Ethernet begin?

Posted on Apr 19 2013 by Stephen Barclay | Comments Off on The connectivity scale part two: Where does broadband end and Ethernet begin?

In last weeks article (Part one) we started to look at the ‘connectivity scale’ and looked at the growing options around copper and fibre based broadband that are driving customers’ expectations of faster and more reliable services. Today we look at Ethernet based products that build on these expectations and deliver service attributes that are even more essential to business critical connectivity. Let’s start with GEA…

Stephen Barclay, Head of Sales

Stephen Barclay, Head of Sales

GEA

GEA is a new service which begins to bridge the gap between fibre broadband and Ethernet based solutions. Like FTTC, GEA utilises the existing copper infrastructure (a single copper pair) between the customer premises and the cabinet and then uses fibre back to the exchange. However, from the exchange it delivers the traffic across the Ethernet core network, not the broadband one. This means it can deliver an uncontended and dedicated service with service guarantees. GEA provides a comprehensive SLA, choice of backup options and a 9 business hour return to service guarantee, making it an attractive and cost effective option for business customers looking for a guaranteed service with short installation times and symmetrical speeds from 2Mbps up to 20Mbps.

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Are you selling FTTC? If not, why not?

Posted on Feb 05 2013 by Stephen Barclay | Comments Off on Are you selling FTTC? If not, why not?
Tags :
Categories : Reselling

As a reseller I’m sure you’re aware fibre broadband is presently a piping hot topic within the industry. You’re bound to have heard quite a bit about ‘FTTC’ (Fibre To The Cabinet) whether it be via your competitor’s adverts and promotions, ongoing Openreach announcements concerning availability or through the general industry news… The fact is, even if you’re not aware of fibre broadband, your customers are and the chances are they’re already considering upgrading to it. If you’re not offering it, then you can bet your competitors are.

Stephen Barclay, Head of Sales

Stephen Barclay, Head of Sales

So what is fibre broadband and FTTC?
FTTC is a form of ‘superfast broadband’ that delivers broadband connectivity by using a fibre based connection up to the street cabinet and then a standard copper connection to the customer’s premises. By using fibre, the connection is able to support much faster speeds than standard copper based connections and provides a more reliable service.

Fibre broadband diagram

So, what’s all the fuss about fibre broadband?
Recent research conducted by the FSB (Federation of Small Businesses) deduced that 63% of Britain’s SME’s are dissatisfied with their current broadband service, complaining of unreliable or slow connections. 60% of those unhappy with their broadband service explained this was due to an inadequate download speed.

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Can suppliers really compensate for loss of broadband?

Posted on Jan 30 2013 by Neil Watson | Comments Off on Can suppliers really compensate for loss of broadband?

Late last week news emerged that a German court had found Internet access to be an ‘essential part of life’ and an ISP had been ordered to pay compensation to a customer who had suffered from a loss of DSL service for 2 months in 2008/9. This unusual decision prompted us to ask, can we really compensate for broadband outages and how would that work in reality?

Neil Watson, Head of Service Operations

Neil Watson, Head of Service Operations

Whilst end user broadband customers are probably jumping for joy at this remote possibility, in reality such a practice really isn’t practical and here’s why:

The wholesale channel
Firstly, we believe this would never work in practice because of the UK’s channel supply model. Most UK providers are reliant on Openreach to fix faults and maintain the major BT based network which runs throughout the UK. In addition to this, unless they are LLU or cable based operators, they purchase their services through BT Wholesale and many then sell these services on to reseller partners who in turn sell to end user customers. So consider for a minute, who would pay the compensation? The end user would claim from the reseller, who would try to claim from their wholesale provider, who would in turn try to claim from either BT Wholesale or Openreach – you can imagine how much time and red tape that would cause!

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Adopting cloud computing – what’s holding your customers back?

Posted on Jan 23 2013 by Guest | Comments Off on Adopting cloud computing – what’s holding your customers back?

There’s no denying that cloud computing is a profitable and rapidly growing market and one that is covered on almost a daily basis by the industry press. Entanet recently partnered with Outsourcery, a leading cloud computing provider, to ensure their high quality hosted services are backed up with reliable connectivity that’s fit for purpose, providing their channel of resellers with a complete business solution for customers adopting this popular new approach.

Claire Mitchell, Outsourcery

Claire Mitchell, Outsourcery

Yet, while we continue to see growth in this market, there are still many business customers that appear to be holding back from the obvious benefits that cloud computing can provide. In this guest blog from Claire Mitchell, Product Manager for Connectivity at Outsourcery, she describes why she thinks this is the case and how it can be overcome to encourage end user business customers to take the plunge into hosted services.

Is a lack of time a reasonable excuse?
Over the past few years there has been a sharp rise in the number of businesses adopting some aspect of cloud computing. Most businesses have initially adopted one or two cloud solutions and grown from there once they have gained confidence in their decision to adopt a cloud approach to their business. Our experience shows that once businesses learn more about the cloud solutions that are available to them and the benefits they bring, they are eager to adopt more. This brings with it profitable opportunities for our channel partners.

At Outsourcery companies usually approach our partners with one specific service in mind but are not always aware of the additional options open to businesses that have adopted or want to adopt a cloud approach.

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