Is telephony fraud the UK’s forgotten crime?

Posted on Mar 14 2017 by Paul Heritage-Redpath | No Comments
Categories : Fraud, Security, VoIP

Telephony fraud is unfortunately nothing new but with the opening of the new National Cyber Security Centre, ITSPA have seized the opportunity to demand that GCHQ work together with industry to combat the issue and make telecoms fraud a priority.

ITSPA argued that “Government, law enforcement and industry need to be more joined up to help combat telephony fraud, which remains a significant problem and is estimated to add 2% to the average user’s phone bill.” said Eli Katz, Chair of ITSPA.

She added “Telephony fraud is in some ways the UK’s forgotten crime. Due to the difficulties in bringing forward successful prosecutions due to the highly international element of crime, it often goes unreported by the telecommunications industry, resulting in law enforcement and Government devoting a disproportionately low level of resource to the area. ITSPA continues to work to encourage industry to report instances of telephony fraud to ensure that the crime receives the attention it deserves.”

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Bye bye net neutrality, hello state censorship?

Posted on Dec 13 2016 by Paul Heritage-Redpath | No Comments

Not content with forcing ISPs to store the browsing history of UK citizens (as enshrined into law via the Investigatory Powers Act), the Government now appears to be ignoring the concept of net neutrality with its latest Bill entering the House of Lords. The Digital Economy Bill, due its second reading in the Lords today (13th December 2016), compels websites carrying material which “it is reasonable to assume from its nature that any classification certificate issued in respect of a video work including it would be an R18 certificate” to carry out age verification checks to try and stop youngsters accessing such material. If the sites don’t do this, ISPs will be required to block them. Yet EU net neutrality rules state that all Internet traffic must be treated equally and goes so far as to say that Governments cannot block access to sites that are legal – even if they are distasteful.

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Poll: The Internet of Things & The Channel

Posted on Nov 21 2016 by Sally Littlefair | No Comments

The Internet of Things (IoT) isn’t going away – every day businesses across the world are coming up with new and innovative ways of exploiting the opportunities that IoT brings. But we want to know what you think. Are you actively pursuing opportunities that exist in the channel to monetise IoT, or are you more cautious? Let us know by leaving a comment below or taking part in our poll.

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IPB now looks certain to be passed within weeks

Posted on Jun 20 2016 by Paul Heritage-Redpath | No Comments

Back in March, we expressed our dismay about the government’s apparent determination to push through the Investigatory Powers Bill (IPB) before the summer (The IPB takes a step closer to being law). The government seems determined to do this at all costs and while there is a possibility that it will be delayed until after the summer recess due to other parliamentary business, it now looks certain to become law within weeks.

Some adjustments have been made to the Bill since March but, in our view, they are too few and do not go anywhere near far enough. At that time, we did have some hope that an alliance of Labour and the SNP would reject the Bill in it’s current form and force much greater scrutiny and the emergence of legislation that would be, as ISPA put it, clear and workable’.

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UPDATE: Can Internet.org coexist with net neutrality (and encryption)?

Posted on May 27 2015 by Neil Watson | No Comments
Categories : Net Neutrality, Security

We recently discussed the criticism Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg was facing with his new Internet.org initiative which aims to enable the world’s poorest people to access the Internet for free by charging the content providers for the end users’ access. Whilst seemingly a noble idea, it is receiving increasing disapproval for its obvious contradiction with net neutrality and now further concerns have been raised about security and privacy.

As we said in our last article, in principle, the idea of providing free Internet access to some of the world’s poorest people is admirable but, as Mr Zuckerberg has admitted himself, delivering free access to the whole Internet simply isn’t possible:

“It costs tens of billions of dollars every year to run the Internet, and no operator could afford this if everything were free, But it is sustainable to build free basic services that are simpler, use less data and work on all low-end phones.”

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