Openreach bins Dark Fibre Access product

Posted on Aug 16 2017 by Paul Heritage-Redpath | Comments Off on Openreach bins Dark Fibre Access product

It’ll come as no surprise to many, but a ruling yesterday by the Office of the Telecoms Adjudicator means you won’t be able to buy access to Openreach’s Dark Fibre for the foreseeable future. This is the latest twist in a long running saga that started with Ofcom’s Business Connectivity Market Review last year and which hit a major stumbling block last month when the Competition Appeals Tribunal ruled in favour of BT, stating that “Ofcom made a string of errors when it drew up the rules for a new market in dark fibre”. Under Ofcom’s directive, Openreach were due to launch their Dark Fibre Access (DFA) product this October, with pricing and terms published by the end of September, but this of course won’t happen now.

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Ofcom gets bullish with Openreach

Posted on Mar 22 2016 by Neil Watson | Comments Off on Ofcom gets bullish with Openreach

Building on last month’s Strategic Review of Digital Communications wherein BT was reprieved of a full split from Openreach, Ofcom has today published its draft Business Connectivity Market Review of the £2bn Leased Lines market. The findings mean that BT will be forced to open its Dark Fibre to competitors by October 2017 as well as fixing faults within 5 hours, reducing the average install time to 40 days (which hasn’t been achieved since 2011) and lowering wholesale prices, with the aim of making this premier connectivity solution more affordable to businesses across the country.

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Celebrating 20 years of Entanet

Posted on Feb 08 2016 by Darren Farnden | Comments Off on Celebrating 20 years of Entanet

This month Entanet celebrates 20 years in business and what a busy 20 years they’ve been! To set the scene, we were started back in 1996 by Taiwanese businessman Jason Tsai. Jason already operated the successful Enta Technologies and saw an opportunity in the provision of Internet services to technology resellers and alike. Entanet was born, delivering Internet connectivity, hosting and colocation services to channel partners. Our timeline below demonstrates just some of the major milestones the company has achieved since then.

We’ve seen many industry changes over the years with new competitors entering the market and old ones folding or being acquired; we’ve adopted a whole host of major regulatory changes and learned of various Government plans and policies to tackle everything from copyright infringement through to surveillance; and of course we’ve been excited to adopt numerous technological developments and advances, bringing new products and services and creating new market opportunities.

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The A-Z of industry issues (part 2)

Posted on Jul 02 2014 by Darren Farnden | Comments Off on The A-Z of industry issues (part 2)

Here it is, what you’ve all been waiting for……the second part of our A-Z, or should that be K-Z of industry issues!

Darren Farnden, Head of Marketing

Darren Farnden, Head of Marketing

K – Kids and protecting them online

How do we effectively protect our children online? Where does parental responsibility end and parental controls begin? It’s a fine balancing act and an important one. Whilst we commend the largest consumer focused ISPs for providing free parental controls to help guard against unsuitable material for minors, it’s not the end of the story. This needs to be backed up with education and parental responsibility. This site contains some useful advice: http://www.saferinternet.org/safer-internet-day.

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World IPv6 Day – reason enough for an extra Bank Holiday?

Posted on Jun 01 2012 by Steve Lalonde | Comments Off on World IPv6 Day – reason enough for an extra Bank Holiday?
Categories : Business, IPv6, Wholesale

June 6th 2012 is World IPv6 Day – the day a number of high profile Internet related companies turn IPv6 on for good. Last year they did a test run and all went well, so this year it’s for real. Leading companies such as Facebook, Google, AT&T, Cisco and D-Link amongst others have been working towards this deadline to make sure their products, services and websites are fully compatible and able to support IPv6. Sounds like a good excuse for another celebratory Bank Holiday!

Steve Lalonde, Chief Technical Officer

Steve Lalonde, Chief Technical Officer

What about IPv4?

Just because a number of companies are switching to IPv6 permanently does not mean that IPv4 will cease to work or the Internet will crash, as a few scaremongering reports may have us believe. Everything will continue to work as it always has done. However, this is an important event for the future of Internet access. IPv4 addresses have almost completely run out now and a replacement in the form of IPv6 is required urgently. IPv6 addresses will provide significantly more potential addresses as they use 128 bit displayed in hexadecimal format and separated by colons e.g. 2ffe:1800:3525:3:200:f8ff:fe21:67cf, as opposed to IPv4 which uses 32 bit addresses. This means IPv6 has 2128 possible addresses compared to 232 that IPv4 was able to provide. However, the switchover to IPv6 will not be instant and, over the next few years, the Internet will use and support both IPv4 and IPv6.

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IPv6: Do or Die!

Posted on Nov 25 2010 by Steve Lalonde | 3 Comments

Vint Cerf, vice-president of Google who is known to many as one of the ‘fathers of the Internet’, declared at a 6UK launch event held in London recently that the UK will run out of IPv4 addresses well before the end of 2011. He said “There’s no question we’re going to be out of address space by springtime of 2011 [and], with more devices than ever set to join the Internet, such as mobile devices and the ‘Internet of things’, IPv6 will be critical to the future of the Internet.”

Steve Lalonde, Chief Technical Officer

Steve Lalonde, Chief Technical Officer

Internet Protocol version six (IPv6) is an Internet Protocol that was developed back in the 1990’s and is the next generation of Internet Protocol version four (IPv4). Whilst IPv4 uses a 32-bit system, IPv6 uses a 128-bit hexadecimal address that has the potential to make available 2128 individual addresses, which is roughly 340 trillion, trillion, trillion. It is thought that by the middle of next year, only 5% of unallocated IPv4 addresses will remain, at which point the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) will distribute the remaining addresses to the five Regional Internet Registries (RIRs).

Cerf continued by sharing his beliefs that the UK has run out of time to address the problem: “it continues to boggle my mind that the UK hasn’t taken this up as an issue. People will ask why their new smart devices don’t work. All the promise and potential of these devices will fail if the ISPs don’t grasp this.”

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IPv6: Ready or not?

Posted on Jul 21 2009 by Neil Watson | 4 Comments
Tags : ,
Categories : Featured, IPv6, Wholesale

Since 1984 IPv4 (Internet Protocol version 4) addresses which consist of four groupings of numbers (e.g. 123.45.67.89) have been used to access the Internet. Twenty five years on and unsurprisingly the 4.3 billion addresses originally available are now running out with only an estimated 700,000 left. Previous estimates stated IPv4 addresses would be depleted by 2011 or 2012 but a more recent announcement from ARIN (American Registry for Internet Numbers) states this could be as soon as 2010.

Neil Watson, Technical Support Manager

Neil Watson, Technical Support Manager

The suggested replacement for IPv4 is IPv6 which provides infinitely more IP addresses due to their hexadecimal format, separated by colons e.g. 2ffe:1800:3525:3:200:f8ff:fe21:67cf. This is just as well, as the number of devices we use to access the Internet continues to increase.

Before we run out of IPv4 addresses completely (possibly as soon as next year), we really need to start implementing IPv6 ones. It’s just a matter of getting on and doing it!

It all sounds relatively straightforward, doesn’t it? Well you’d think so. The media and several leading Internet figures have expressed concerns that ISPs’ take up of IPv6 has been too slow and that unless adoption is accelerated we will have consumed all of the available IPv4 addresses before IPv6 is fully supported. In the worst case this would make it impossible for ISPs to accommodate any more subscribers. In reality IPv6 is already available and some ISPs are already utilising it, including Entanet. Whilst several of our competitors may not be implementing IPv6 just yet I find it hard to believe that any would be so negligent that they actually reach this crisis point without taking action. Nevertheless it is possible and if it does happen it will be you and your customers that will be affected.

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ISPs vs BBC iPlayer – Missing the point?

Posted on Jun 25 2009 by Neil Watson | 5 Comments

The last month has seen substantial media coverage of the latest row that has erupted between BT Retail and a number of content providers including the BBC. However, we think a fundamental issue is being missed. Instead of BT Retail focusing attention on the BBC et al to contribute to its increasing costs, it should instead be tackling its wholesale provider to reduce the price of bandwidth. Here I explain why this has a wider significance to ISPs and the industry as a whole.

June 2009 proved to be a turbulent month for two of the UK’s industry giants, BT and the BBC. The month began with reports that BT was throttling its option 1 customers’ connections to the BBC’s iPlayer service (and other bandwidth hungry services including YouTube) during peak times, reducing speeds to less than 1Mbps on the advertised up to 8Mbps service. This, according to the BBC, notably affected the iPlayer’s service quality.

Neil Watson, Technical Support Manager

Neil Watson, Technical Support Manager

The argument escalated when the BBC claimed that BT’s advertising of its option 1 package shied away from detailing this level of throttling. Instead it states that the package is capable of 25 hours of iPlayer streaming and only refers to the throttling in its FUP.

By mid June the plot thickened with a request from BT for content providers to pay towards the cost of delivering customers to their sites, claiming that the “free ride for content providers was over”.

“We can’t give the content providers a completely free ride and continue to give customers the [service] they want at the price they expect,” said John Petter, managing director of BT Retail’s consumer business.

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Why ISPs need a 21CN strategy – today

Posted on Dec 04 2008 by Neil Watson | Comments Off on Why ISPs need a 21CN strategy – today

The UK’s broadband infrastructure is developing, through BT21CN, to provide next generation services such as ADSL2+ and pressure is increasing on ISPs to put themselves in a suitable position to provide them. Both residential and business customers want speed, resilience and flexibility at a price that doesn’t break the bank, especially in the current economic climate.

Neil Watson, Technical Support Manager

Neil Watson, Technical Support Manager

ISPs now have little choice about whether or not to broaden their product portfolios – the market has made that decision for them. What’s important now is that they determine how best to approach 21CN in order to compete and retain, if not grow, their market share. In short, they must have a 21CN strategy that’s right for their business.

Deciding the right strategy isn’t straightforward however. Right now, ISPs are deliberating over what seem to be the only two options – “Do we invest heavily in the infrastructure required to take Wholesale Broadband Connect (WBC), or take the lesser, managed option, Wholesale Broadband Managed Connect (WBMC)?”

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