Posts Tagged ‘Business’

Unlimited broadband: Fact or Fiction?

Posted on Jul 05 2010 by Guest | 1 Comment

Following the recent news that the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) is planning a review of ISPs’ use of terminology such as ‘unlimited broadband’, we invited Sebastien Lahtinen, co-founder of thinkbroadband.com, to guest blog on this subject.

Sebastien Lahtinen, Co-founder of thinkbroadband.com

Sebastien Lahtinen

Why ‘unlimited broadband’ is not a viable business proposition in today’s economic climate

In the last few years, broadband service providers have been offering what they call ‘unlimited’ broadband services in the hope of attracting customers in what has been a growth market. This has been possible as, historically, capacity of ISP networks has not been a major limiting factor when the typical broadband service was anything up to 2Mbps.

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Out with the old and in with the new

Posted on May 20 2010 by Darren Farnden | Comments Off on Out with the old and in with the new

What does the new coalition government have in store for the Internet industry?

Well this month has seen history made with the formation of our new coalition government. As David Cameron and Nick Clegg start out on their new partnership we take a look at each party’s previous stance on several topical industry issues and suggest how we think the new coalition government will go about tackling them.

Darren Farnden, Head of Marketing

Darren Farnden, Head of Marketing

Reviewing the DEA

Let’s start with one of the industry’s biggest issues. The DEA (Digital Economy Act) has been one of the most talked about topics with debate starting right back at its conception, but the most infuriating thing of all about the DEB was the ridiculous way in which this controversial Bill was rushed through the wash-up and into law.

During the election campaign the Liberal Democrat’s Nick Clegg stated that he believed this was a “stitch-up”. He said “We did our best to prevent the Digital Economy Bill being rushed through at the last moment. It badly needed more debate and amendment, and we are extremely worried that it will now lead to completely innocent people having their Internet connections cut off. It was far too heavily weighted in favour of the big corporations and those who are worried about too much information becoming available. It badly needs to be repealed, and the issues revisited.”

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Fuss ‘n’ Fibre

Posted on May 17 2010 by Elsa Chen | Comments Off on Fuss ‘n’ Fibre

Everyone seems to be talking about fibre at the moment – the industry news is full of it. What with BT announcing expanded fibre coverage and numerous providers announcing new fibre based services and participation in BT’s latest fibre trials, it seems to be one of the industry’s current hot topics. So, just what is going on and what is all the fuss about?

Elsa Chen, General Manager

Elsa Chen, General Manager

Towards the end of last year BT ran trials of FTTC (Fibre to the Cabinet) which provided speeds of up to 40Mbps by utilising fibre optic links to street level cabinets and delivering connectivity via VDSL2 technology between the cabinet and the premises. The trials ran until late December and proved successful. Entanet itself was involved. Since then a number of providers including BT Retail have announced the availability of their FTTC based services with prices ranging from £19.99/month up to £179/month for various packages and options.

But why stop at 40Mbps? BT recently announced its latest round of FTTP (Fibre to the Premises) trials which are expected to provide speeds of up to 100Mbps by delivering a fibre based connection right to the premises. Once again Entanet has been significantly involved from an early stage, starting off with the Kesgrave trials way back in 2008 where we experienced customers reaching speeds of 98Mbps.

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Election 2010 – Drawing the broadband battle lines

Posted on Apr 19 2010 by Darren Farnden | Comments Off on Election 2010 – Drawing the broadband battle lines

It’s election time and at the moment you can’t turn on the TV, read a newspaper or listen to the radio without being reminded of that fact. Last week saw the launch of several political parties’ election manifestos and whilst the majority of them (notably not the Pirate Party UK) cover a wide range of topical issues we have focussed our investigation on what each party has to say about Digital Britain and the Internet industry. Here is what we found:

Darren Farnden, Head of Marketing

Darren Farnden, Head of Marketing

In the red corner: The Incumbents – Labour

Let’s start with the incumbents, Labour. In the past they have been very vocal about their plans for a Digital Britain and their aims to make the UK a world leader in this area. Only last week they controversially rushed through the Digital Economy Bill, now Act (Entanet Opinion: Digital Economy Bill: The end is nigh…). So what are their plans regarding the Internet and Digital Britain if they are re-elected?

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Google flees Great Firewall of China

Posted on Apr 06 2010 by Neil Watson | Comments Off on Google flees Great Firewall of China

Back in December 2009 Google and a number of other high profile companies were the target of several cyber attacks which were allegedly traced back to the Chinese government. In Google’s case the hackers appeared to be after the Gmail account details of a number of human rights advocates. We started to cover this story in January when Google announced that it was considering withdrawing its Google.cn operations following the attacks.

Neil Watson, Head of Service Operations

Neil Watson, Head of Service Operations

On its company blog, Google stated “We launched Google.cn in January 2006 in the belief that the benefits of increased access to information for people in China and a more open Internet outweighed our discomfort in agreeing to censor some results. At the time we made clear that “we will carefully monitor conditions in China, including new laws and other restrictions on our services. If we determine that we are unable to achieve the objectives outlined we will not hesitate to reconsider our approach to China.”

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Google finally stands up to China

Posted on Jan 13 2010 by Neil Watson | 1 Comment

Is it the end of the road for Google.cn?

Yesterday on the official Google Blog, David Drummond, Google’s Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer announced that following a cyber attack in December Google is now considering withdrawing its operations from the Chinese market. Clearly there’s more to this though and we think market leaders should make a stand against the restriction that Chinese government censorship applies to Chinese web users.

Neil Watson, Head of Operations

Neil Watson, Head of Operations

Through a thorough investigation since mid December Google allegedly has evidence to suggest that the attack originated in China and its aim was to access the Gmail accounts of several US, European and Chinese based human rights advocates. The company also has evidence to suggest that the attacks did not only affect Google, advising that an additional 20 large corporations in various industries including the Internet, media, finance and chemical sectors were also affected.

The Register reports that one of these additional companies was possibly Adobe, although the company has not confirmed whether or not the two incidents were related. Adobe also announced news of its attack via its corporate blog advising that they had become aware of “a computer security incident involving a sophisticated, coordinated attack against corporate network systems managed by Adobe and other companies.”

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Poll: The Government’s IMP is…?

Posted on Jan 11 2010 by Gemma Dickinson | Comments Off on Poll: The Government’s IMP is…?

The UK’s mobile operators have recently united against the government’s planned IMP (Improvement and Modernisation Programme) which will require all ISPs and operators to collect and store all IP communications.

We would like to know what you think about the government’s plans and have created a poll to capture your thoughts.

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2009 – The good, the bad and the ugly!

Posted on Dec 09 2009 by Elsa Chen | Comments Off on 2009 – The good, the bad and the ugly!

As we approach the end of an eventful year I thought it would be apt to take a look back over the main industry talking points of 2009 to evaluate what happened, why we were discussing it and where we are currently at. When we have completed that let’s take a stab at predicting what we will be discussing in 2010.

Elsa Chen, General Manager

Elsa Chen, General Manager

The ‘hottest’ topic of 2009 was undoubtedly illegal file sharing

We first covered this subject back in April with an article discussing the Pirate Bay case. The four founders of the website ‘The Pirate Bay’ were found guilty in a Swedish court for assisting the illegal downloading of copyrighted material.  They were each sentenced to 1 year in jail and ordered to pay £2.4million in damages to the entertainment industry. This was the catalyst that started the raging debate between the entertainment industry, the government and ISPs which continues to this date. The entertainment industry and a number of high profile MPs, in particular Peter Mandelson, are calling for a three strikes and you’re cut-off policy. However, ISPs have continuously raised concerns regarding the accuracy of correctly identifying offenders and the fact that cutting a user off is presuming guilt before a fair trial with minimal and potentially flawed evidence.

This topic continued to be covered for several months and was once again inflamed with the release of the Digital Britain Report which actually advised against a three strikes policy, much to the annoyance of the entertainment industry.

So where are we at now?

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Is residential broadband recession proof?

Posted on Sep 08 2009 by Neil Watson | 1 Comment

It might come as a surprise to learn that Ofcom, in some of its latest research, reports that residential customers now view broadband as an essential utility for communication. Previously it was thought only business customers had come to rely on it significantly.

Neil Watson, Technical Support Manager

Neil Watson, Technical Support Manager

Equally unsurprisingly, the report shows that during the recession we are spending more time at home browsing the Web and that this pastime has become more important than other forms of social enjoyment. When asked which activity they would rather cut back on, 47% of respondents said dining out and 41% said holidays compared to just 10% willing to cut back on their broadband service. While these findings may not raise eyebrows, they do reiterate the fact that residential users are now viewing their broadband service as more of an essential utility than an expendable luxury. Therefore we pose the question, is broadband recession proof?

Despite the findings that only 10% would sacrifice their broadband connection, the report highlighted that the same respondents are however keen to control how much they spend. In the last year the average household spend on Internet services fell by 66p a month and there is now a growing trend towards the adoption of bundled services. Again hardly earth shattering results, after all we are in a recession and we are all looking for ways to save money!

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Swine Flu: The end of the Internet?

Posted on Aug 14 2009 by Elsa Chen | 1 Comment
Tags :
Categories : Business, Featured

You must all be aware by now of the swine flu pandemic that has gripped the country (and in fact the world) over the last few months. You can’t turn on the TV, grab a cup of coffee in the canteen or even walk down the street without overhearing someone talking about it. But what we are going to discuss is the effect of this pandemic on our industry, your businesses and the UK economy as a whole.

Elsa Test

Elsa Chen

So first off let’s discuss swine flu and the Internet. Contrary to several reports the pandemic is highly unlikely (never say never) to bring the UK’s Internet crashing down. Well, why would anyone think that in the first place you may ask? Concerns have been raised that if the pandemic reaches the worst case scenarios recently described by leading health officials it would have a huge impact on many of our fundamental services such as transport. With significant numbers of transport staff affected the rail and road networks would struggle to cope, possibly restricting services and making it difficult for unaffected people to get into work. This would mean more and more people would need to work from home, therefore putting increased strain on the Internet in the UK.

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