Posts Tagged ‘Wholesale’

IPv6: Do or Die!

Posted on Nov 25 2010 by Steve Lalonde | 3 Comments

Vint Cerf, vice-president of Google who is known to many as one of the ‘fathers of the Internet’, declared at a 6UK launch event held in London recently that the UK will run out of IPv4 addresses well before the end of 2011. He said “There’s no question we’re going to be out of address space by springtime of 2011 [and], with more devices than ever set to join the Internet, such as mobile devices and the ‘Internet of things’, IPv6 will be critical to the future of the Internet.”

Steve Lalonde, Chief Technical Officer

Steve Lalonde, Chief Technical Officer

Internet Protocol version six (IPv6) is an Internet Protocol that was developed back in the 1990’s and is the next generation of Internet Protocol version four (IPv4). Whilst IPv4 uses a 32-bit system, IPv6 uses a 128-bit hexadecimal address that has the potential to make available 2128 individual addresses, which is roughly 340 trillion, trillion, trillion. It is thought that by the middle of next year, only 5% of unallocated IPv4 addresses will remain, at which point the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) will distribute the remaining addresses to the five Regional Internet Registries (RIRs).

Cerf continued by sharing his beliefs that the UK has run out of time to address the problem: “it continues to boggle my mind that the UK hasn’t taken this up as an issue. People will ask why their new smart devices don’t work. All the promise and potential of these devices will fail if the ISPs don’t grasp this.”

Share this article:
Share
Read More »

IPv6: Ready or not?

Posted on Jul 21 2009 by Neil Watson | 4 Comments
Tags : ,
Categories : Featured, IPv6, Wholesale

Since 1984 IPv4 (Internet Protocol version 4) addresses which consist of four groupings of numbers (e.g. 123.45.67.89) have been used to access the Internet. Twenty five years on and unsurprisingly the 4.3 billion addresses originally available are now running out with only an estimated 700,000 left. Previous estimates stated IPv4 addresses would be depleted by 2011 or 2012 but a more recent announcement from ARIN (American Registry for Internet Numbers) states this could be as soon as 2010.

Neil Watson, Technical Support Manager

Neil Watson, Technical Support Manager

The suggested replacement for IPv4 is IPv6 which provides infinitely more IP addresses due to their hexadecimal format, separated by colons e.g. 2ffe:1800:3525:3:200:f8ff:fe21:67cf. This is just as well, as the number of devices we use to access the Internet continues to increase.

Before we run out of IPv4 addresses completely (possibly as soon as next year), we really need to start implementing IPv6 ones. It’s just a matter of getting on and doing it!

It all sounds relatively straightforward, doesn’t it? Well you’d think so. The media and several leading Internet figures have expressed concerns that ISPs’ take up of IPv6 has been too slow and that unless adoption is accelerated we will have consumed all of the available IPv4 addresses before IPv6 is fully supported. In the worst case this would make it impossible for ISPs to accommodate any more subscribers. In reality IPv6 is already available and some ISPs are already utilising it, including Entanet. Whilst several of our competitors may not be implementing IPv6 just yet I find it hard to believe that any would be so negligent that they actually reach this crisis point without taking action. Nevertheless it is possible and if it does happen it will be you and your customers that will be affected.

Share this article:
Share
Read More »

Why ISPs need a 21CN strategy – today

Posted on Dec 04 2008 by Neil Watson | Comments Off on Why ISPs need a 21CN strategy – today

The UK’s broadband infrastructure is developing, through BT21CN, to provide next generation services such as ADSL2+ and pressure is increasing on ISPs to put themselves in a suitable position to provide them. Both residential and business customers want speed, resilience and flexibility at a price that doesn’t break the bank, especially in the current economic climate.

Neil Watson, Technical Support Manager

Neil Watson, Technical Support Manager

ISPs now have little choice about whether or not to broaden their product portfolios – the market has made that decision for them. What’s important now is that they determine how best to approach 21CN in order to compete and retain, if not grow, their market share. In short, they must have a 21CN strategy that’s right for their business.

Deciding the right strategy isn’t straightforward however. Right now, ISPs are deliberating over what seem to be the only two options – “Do we invest heavily in the infrastructure required to take Wholesale Broadband Connect (WBC), or take the lesser, managed option, Wholesale Broadband Managed Connect (WBMC)?”

Share this article:
Share
Read More »